Tag Archives: stars

First Planck results: from the coldest to the largest objects in the universe

Last week astronomers working on the European Space Agency’s Planck experiment convened in Paris to talk about their first results, and they weren’t short of things to say. No less than 25 papers were announced on Tuesday 11th January — and this is before work has even started on the mission’s main aim of putting together a detailed picture of the Cosmic Microwave Background, or CMB.

The CMB is a uniform glow of microwave radiation, with only tiny fluctuations, that gives us a snapshot of the universe around 380,000 years after the Big Bang. We’ve seen it before, courtesy of WMAP in 2003 and COBE in 1992. But Planck has the power to look at this faint glow in never-before-seen detail, revealing more about the universe than every before.

Video showing locations of the different compact objects found by Planck.

Before they can get to work on this new view of the CMB, however, astronomers must study the foreground noise of the picture in detail. This “noise” is made up of structures formed after the CMB: galaxies, galaxy clusters, and matter within the Milky Way, such as gas and dust.

Planck astronomers studied this “noise” in order to better understand how they can remove it from the picture, and just see the CMB. It’s called noise because it gets in the way when we try to look at the CMB, but actually it’s very interesting in its own right. These structures can tell us a lot about the formation of stars, galaxy clusters and even the universe itself — and that’s what some of the 25 new papers announced last week are about.

One of the superclusters detected by Planck and confirmed by XMM-Newton. Credit: ESA/Planck Collaboration

First up, we have galaxy clusters. They’re the largest structures in the universe, and the Planck mission has just completed the first all-sky survey of them using something called the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect (SZE). Galaxy clusters don’t just contain galaxies; they also hold hot gas and a large amount of dark matter. The SZE arrises when high energy particles in the hot gas interact with the CMB and distort it. Astronomers can see this distortion in the CMB and use it to detect galaxy clusters.

In total, 189 galaxy clusters have been detected by Planck using the SZE. This includes 169 that had already been detected using other methods, and 20 brand new ones. The really interesting thing about these galaxy clusters is the huge range of masses they encompass — between one and fifteen hundred trillion times the mass of the Sun. Galaxy clusters are extremely sensitive to the underlying framework that describes our universe, and so can shed light on the evolution and structure of the universe.

By working together with another experiment at the ESA, the XMM Newton X-ray observatory, 11 of the newly discovered galaxy clusters have already been confirmed. XMM-Newton has been able to get a closer look at some and reveal that two of the new clusters are in fact superclusters. That is, they are clusters of galaxy clusters, rather than simply clusters of galaxies.

Map showing cold, dense clumps of dust in the Milky Way. Credit: ESA/Planck Collaboration

Not content with studying the largest structures in the universe, Planck has also taken a look at the coldest.

Thanks to Planck, we can now detect material at lower temperatures than ever before. And we can do it more accurately than ever before, too. Astronomers working on the Planck mission have just finished looking at the results of the first all-sky survey of compact cold dust clumps in the Milky Way, and cool dust in other galaxies. These clumps are some of the coldest objects in the universe, and are key to understanding some of the hottest — cold, dusty clumps, like the ones seen by Planck, are believed to be sites of star formation.

These clumps have temperatures of only 7 to 16 degrees above absolute zero. Most of the clumps Planck found were only a few light years away from Earth, but some were up to eight thousand light years away*.

Though Planck was only able to look in detail at this dust in our own galaxy, the results are vital to understanding the behaviour of similar dust in other galaxies. When we look at galaxies that are further away, we also see them as they were further back in time. As we learn more about star formation in our own galaxy from these cold clumps, we will begin to have a better understanding of star formation in galaxies that are further away — and further back in time.

However, Planck has limitations, and these mean that it cannot look into the heart of these cold objects. This is where the ESA’s Herschel space observatory comes in. It has a much higher resolution than Planck and has no problem seeing the detailed structure of the clumps. Between them, Herschel and Planck can form a complete picture of the clumps at both small and large scales. With their help, we can effectively reel in far away galaxies for a closer look and learn about star formation throughout the history of the universe.

Cold dust clumps and galaxy clusters are just two of the interesting discoveries Planck has made in the two full sky surveys it’s completed since it launched in May 2009. It will continue to survey the sky until at least the end of 2011, but full results, including that new detailed picture of the CMB minus the noise, will not be published before early 2013. That might seem like a long way away, but these first results should keep astronomers busy for a little while yet. Then they can get on with the job of studying the CMB, which will no doubt keep them busy for an even longer time to come.

*A light year is roughly three thousand billion miles. For comparison, the Sun is just less than a hundred billion miles, or eight light minutes, from Earth


More on Planck
Watch the press conference
More about Planck’s findings at the BBC
The 25 papers published by the Planck team

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A galaxy far, far away…

This post was chosen as an Editor's Selection for ResearchBlogging.org

When we look up into the sky at night, we see stars (even in London I can usually spot a few!). But there haven’t always been stars and galaxies in the universe. In a period known as the dark ages – not to be confused with the other dark ages – there was no light at all. After the the ionised gas that filled the universe in its very early life cleared, there was a very long period of, well, nothing. The universe was transparent, but contained no stars or galaxies for just less than 400 million years. The process that allowed stars and galaxies to eventually form is known as reionisation, and new research published in Nature last month details a discovery that may open a new window on to this time.

Galaxy UDFy-38135539 shown in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Image: NASA

In the paper, Lehnert and colleagues reported detecting the most distant object physicists have ever seen: a galaxy, the light from which was emitted less than 600 million years after the Big Bang. It’s the first galaxy known to have lived fully within the epoch of reionisation.

The galaxy, which goes by the catchy name UDFy-38135539, has a redshift* of z = 8.6 – the highest ever observed – and it was from this that the team were able to calculate the galaxy’s age. UDFy-38135539 was first spotted by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, but Lehnert and colleagues made ground based observations using an instrument called SINFONI on the Very Large Telescope in Chile to look at the galaxy in more detail.

The instrument helped by splitting up the light from the galaxy in a process known as spectroscopy, allowing the team to look for a feature called the Lyman-α line. Each photon making up the Lyman-α line would have been emitted when an electron in a hydrogen ion dropped down from a higher energy level to a lower one. The photons that Lehnert and colleagues observed were ultraviolet when they were emitted from the galaxy, but when they reached Earth had wavelengths in the infrared region, giving the high redshift mentioned above. This stretching of the wavelength occurs because of the length of time the photons took to travel here – they were created just 600 million years after the big bang. This may sound like a long time, but if you consider that the age of the Universe is 13.7 billion years, you’ll appreciate that 600 million years is actually very early on in the grand scheme of things, and certainly very, very long ago. Physicists know that reionisation started within 600 million years of the Big Bang, so Lehnert and colleagues came to the conclusion that galaxy UDFy-38135539 must have lived within the epoch of reionisation.

Diagram showing the universe from the Big Bang, to now. Image: Wikipedia

At the beginning, the Universe was very hot and dense, with conditions similar to that in a particle accelerator. After three minutes, the Universe had expanded and cooled enough to have formed all of the elementary particles, as well as protons and neutrons (also in these first three minutes was the matter-antimatter annihilation that destroyed most of the antimatter in the universe). For 400,000 years after this the universe was full of ionised gas, and was opaque. Then, in a period known as recombination, the electrons and protons in the gas got together and formed atoms; this made everything a lot clearer. For around 400 million years after that, the universe remained transparent and rather empty, with no stars or galaxies. It was only when astronomical objects, possibly quasars or small galaxies, began to form due to gravitational collapse that things began to get a bit more interesting.

These objects poured radiation out into the universe, causing reionisation. During reionisation, electrons were stripped back off the hydrogen atoms that were formed when they first joined up with the protons, and the universe began to turn into an ionised gas once again. Fortunately, due to the expansion that had taken place in the time between recombination and reionisation, the universe was able to remain transparent despite these bubbles of plasma that had begun to form all over the place. This process led to the formation of the stars and galaxies we see today, but physicists are not yet sure exactly how this all happened.

Because the galaxy UDFy-38135539 lived within the epoch of reionisation, it may be able to help us explain how reionisation started, and how these objects that formed in the cosmological dark ages were able to transform the universe from a mostly neutral one, to one filled with ionised gas.

There are already a few other faraway candidates lined up for study too, and Lehnert and colleagues have shown that such study is possible with current instruments, but astronomers will have to wait for the new wave of telescopes to really study reionisation in detail. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is the successor to Hubble, and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), which is the successor of the VLT, are two that will allow for this more detailed investigation. Both are due to be up and running later on this decade.

* Cosmological redshift is a measure of how fast an object is moving away from the Earth and is a consequence of the expanding Universe. Objects with higher redshift are moving away from the Earth faster than those with lower redshifts, and are further away too. See an earlier post of mine for an image showing redshift in action.

Reference

M. D. Lehnert, N. P. H. Nesvadba, J. -G. Cuby, A. M. Swinbank, S. Morris, B. Clement, C. J. Evans, M. N. Bremer, & S. Basa (2010). Spectroscopic confirmation of a galaxy at redshift z=8.6 Nature, 467 arXiv: 1010.4312v1

Further reading

BBC article, including short phone interview with Malcolm Bremer who was one of the physicists on the team.

Blog post at Cosmic log, which includes a Q&A with lead researcher Matt Lehnert.

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Does one size fit all when it comes to star formation?

It is widely known (among astrophysicists at least!) that disks of accumulated matter are an essential component in the formation of low mass stars. These disks form when a rotating cloud of dust and gas collapses and, after formation, they direct material from the cloud onto a protostar at the centre. This protostar keeps accreting more and more material until it reaches a temperature high enough for it to fuse hydrogen. At this point it starts its life on the main sequence – the longest stage in the evolution of a star, and the one that our own Sun is currently at.

This all works fine for stars with less than about ten times the mass of the Sun, but above that limit our knowledge of the formation of stars gets a little hazy. In the above process, the protostar is constantly emitting light and therefore exerting pressure outwards. This radiation pressure works against the gravity that is causing more material to be added to the protostar. It is believed that no stars with a mass higher than about ten solar masses could form by the above method, as the radiation pressure from higher mass star would become more powerful than gravity and halt the formation. For this reason, it has been suggested that high mass stars form when two smaller stars merge, and not through the formation of disks like their less massive counterparts.

However, researchers working on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer at the European Southern Observatory have found evidence of a disk of material around a young star about twenty times as massive as the Sun. The star IRAS 13481-6124 is in the constellation Centaurus and it about ten thousand light years away from us.

Below you can see a video of IRAS 13481-6124 and its disk:

Kraus et al detected two bow shocks, caused by the interaction between an outflow of gas and dust from the star and the interstellar medium. The existence of this outflow is evidence for a disk around the star, as jets of material are a common feature of accretion disks around protostars.

This disk surrounding IRAS 13481-6124 is very hot and compact, and is very similar to disks observed around low mass stars, suggesting that the formation of high mass stars may not be so different after all.

Reference:
Kraus, S., Hofmann, K., Menten, K., Schertl, D., Weigelt, G., Wyrowski, F., Meilland, A., Perraut, K., Petrov, R., Robbe-Dubois, S., Schilke, P., & Testi, L. (2010). A hot compact dust disk around a massive young stellar object Nature, 466 (7304), 339-342 DOI: 10.1038/nature09174

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